Let’s Go For A Walk!

Are we finally seeing some good times in the wild? I mean, our neighborhoods?
In my neighborhood, in NYC, the plywood has come down from the stores, the streets are alive with the outdoor restaurants.
I have been taking the subways, buses, and a coupla taxi’s. The taxi drivers have to remember the mask deal, especially in a closed space.
Mostly, it’s walking. That’s how you see what’s really going. Like always, right?

So, the basic walking kit has been in use, and this is what it consists of:

*Fuji X100F with a lens shade
*Spare batteries for the camera and the phone
*Extra SD cards- I’ve been going either SanDisk or Sony, 128gb, super fast cards.
*LensPen, because you need to keep it all clean.
*A wrist strap, so I have that extra bit of security carrying the camera.
*And it all goes into a Peak Design Sling 10L

*Plus, if you are new to this, you may want to check out the listed book on the 100V

All of it is here in this link.

Why this gear? One main reason is that I have used this setup for years, and it works.

First, the main event ,the camera.
the Fuji 100V has a leaf shutter and can be put into electronic shutter mode, so it can be silent.

The files are beautiful. Plus, you can access all of the Fuji film stocks as algorithms for your JPGs. Things like Provia, Acros, Classic Chrome, Sepia. They are added to JPGs only as you are hopefully shooting RAW and JPG, for editing later. In LightRoom, the FujiFilm film stocks come up as a choice in develop mode so you an get those formulas added to your RAW files, as well.
The small size of the camera is ergonomically right, AND most importantly, I’m not digging into menus to adjust my exposure. A hallmark of Fuji cameras, it gives an analog feel to a sophisticated camera.
I go for the all black version, as it has a more has a discreet presence, and being silent, when using electronic shutter, you can get shots that you may have missed.

The lens shade, allows me to be fast, and not missing the opportunity. With the shade, nothing is hitting the lens, and you grab and go. In jacket weather, I sometimes juts go out with the camera in a jacket pocket.

Always have spare batteries when you are out walking. Nothing hurts worse than having an empty camera when you see the shot.

SD cards can get filled up. Or go bad. Yes, that does happen. I usually pack 2 extra.
LensPen: I have one of these in every camera bag. They just work. cleans the lens, and wipes away and dust. Cheap, and cheerful.
And the wrist strap. EVERY camera I own has a wrist strap. On this smaller camera I use this simple strap.

The more robust, interchangeable lens cameras, get the SpiderHolster spiderlight wrist strap. It’s perfect and after a full day of shooting is still comfortable.

Now the bag.

We all have a bunch perhaps, or have tried a few.
This Peak Design Sling 10L is my perfect walk around bag.
Room for my Fuji x100f, with space to scale up to a X-T4 with a 14mm, a 56mm, and a 55-200 (my crop duster). Or the leave out the 56mm, and add in the 50-140mm.
Straps on the bottom to hold a monopod, tripod, or lately, an umbrella!

Into the front pocket, I slip credentials, biz cards, SSD hard drive, and maybe a protein bar.
There is an inside flap, which has been able to hold an iPad, when that may be needed. Yep, have the keyboard case, and the pencil so things can be edited on the run.
When we can go inside again, this will be more useful.
The shoulder strap is comfortable, and easily adjustable.
There are a couple of design features I especially like:
*The zipper top opens TO the body, as opposed to away. An extra bit of security.

*And the bag itself has a somewhat of a defined shape as opposed to soft, shapeless design.
It allows me to easily slip my camera in and out of the bag.

This is the basic kit.
I do always throw in a Baggu reusable bag, because while you are out, you may need to pick up some things. Like dinner, or some groceries.

I have added a carabiner to the back handle to hook up a bag to.
Now, one thing that is NOT on the bag is a water bottle holder.

Now, I will toss in the Fuji X-T4, with a 14mm lens, for street when I want to switch up the lensing. I’ll break that more robust kit down in another post.

Stay safe and healthy out there!

Nikon Adds New FF Mirrorless To The Line-Up

It’s the way things are going: either go smaller with mirrorless, or go big with 100MP medium format. Even today, Canon announced the end of the 5D line.

Nikon has committed to the full frame mirrorless system, and with the new, Z5, has brought the line-up to a sweet affordable price.

Continue Reading »

Best Gimbal Hack I’ve Used!

First of all, do you use a gimbal? great way to get smooth pro video with your DSLR or Mirrorless cameras. After going through a bunch (will be selling the left behind gimbals) I’m partial to the Ronin SC.

Coupled with a Fuji X-T4, and a SmallRig ball joint with a Feelworld monitor (I know, not Small HD, but does the job) this rig has great software, right weight, and responsive. That is a key element. Connects to a sweet app, easy to control through it, and even updates firmware from your phone. Well done!

There is one thing I know you feel if you have gone out with your gimbal rig of late.

The weight! Plus the fact that the configuration is a little unwieldy.

The question comes up as to how to carry, after your arms get a bit wobbly, or you need to tend to swap the camera battery replacement, media card swap., on the fly.

Once it’s built, I want to be able to easily use it, without breaking it down, and rebuilding, and remain mobile. So it was time to figure out a shoulder strap solution.

It started with perusing my new favorite accessory site, SmallRig. Well made, well thought out, additions for just about any gear you own.

After looking at a ring to fit the Ronin SC with 1/4-20 holes to add things like a mic, light, etc. I came upon this set-up.

Now the idea of having a safe and secure ring to add a strap to the gimbal, and not only be able to sling it on my shoulder when not in use, BUT also be able to help set it against my body for controlled moves, is a huge winner in my opinion. Especially if you are out and about these days, covering events, you have to be on the move.

The strap was the next consideration. Peak Design has been my favorite currently, as the ability to adjust the length, and lock up fast is critical.

Plus the comfort factor. The interchangeability of the strap for different gear, using the anchors, is key. It comes with 4 anchors and a 1/2-20 clip, usually to put on the bottom of your camera.

Yes, SmallRig has a strap, but since I already owned one, a bit of savings. The design is more to my liking in it’s ability to adjust and lock the strap to the preferred length.

I did add on these 2 small bits, to ensure the right spacing for the anchor cords.

 

So that is one way to give you some more gimbal transport freedom.

Another way is to connect one end of the strap to the ring, and the other end to the bottom of the gimbal, giving you a different weight distribution situation. Using another piece included with the Peak Design strap, and attaching that to the bottom of the gimbal. The same anchors that you have on the strap can then be attached to the bottom. Different balance situation

You can also spread the detachable tripod part of the gimbal, and use your body to help stabilize the gimbal even more, letting the legs spread on your body, while the rig is secured on your shoulder, and you further stabilize the shot, with your hands on the stem of the rig.

Basically this whole addition to your Ronin SC (or perhaps other gimbals as well) will make your rig a more portable, fast action, and comfortable tool to work with.

Check out SmallRig, Peak Design, and as always, BH is my top shop for gear.

Stay Healthy, Everyone!

Your Stand Up Desk Just Got Portable!

WFH is the order of the day now, and a return to an office seems to be a ways off.
So now you are spending even more time in front of your screen, than ever before. Intently concentrating, making sure you are engaged, or looking like you are, forces you to stay on that keyboard!
If you have been feeling the strain on your body, you are not alone.
One of the best ways to help out the pinches, aches, and overall discomfort is to make the move to a stand-up desk.
And I’ve done the research. Most solutions are way too big, and being in an NYC apt, space is at a premium.

Check this out:
The Moft Z


Continue Reading »

The Best Way to Top Off Your New Camera

There is a 20% sale on if you’d like to get one of these!

I have always skipped generations on cameras as I feel that I’ll get the life out of my current bodies before I’ll see enough upgrades. Glass is forever, but the little computers we hold in our hands (ok, sensor upgrades) will keep getting better.

Having just done the research on the new Fuji X-T4, it was time. So many reasons for the upgrade from X-T2, but prime ones: in body IBIS, flippy screen, headphone jack, separate stills/video switch. 

Wish the headphone jack didn’t need a separate dongle, but have just dedicated a 3.5 mm headset to the dongle. Not a big deal. Working on a bluetooth solution. Concerned about latency.

But I digress.

The first thing is with new/new to you is the camera unboxing. Making sure all of the parts are there, get that hand feel on the body, to see what the physical updates are, and of course, charging the battery. Full charge, remember!

By staying with one line of cameras, the menu systems are usually familiar, and you can start to see any changes to that, which could affect your way of shooting. Usually not huge. And I’ll admit I do scour manufacture sites to see what the they call out as new.

So…..battery was charged, menu set and buttons customized to your preferred way of shooting, and now what?

My final bit of getting the camera ready for it’s first shoot comes with the addition of the SpiderLight Hand Strap. This is my absolute favorite hand strap, and sits on all of my cameras. The Lite version, as opposed to Pro, sits better for me on mirrorless. Pro adds another safety strap, if you like, for security more on the larger DSLRs.

Here is the main process of getting it installed. It’s easy, and I always feel secure and comfortable, even on a long day hold.

Continue Reading »